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technologies foundation is proud to support to the contrary on pbs our foundation seeks to advance science education and further society's understanding of the life sciences including the impact of gee ownmics on the practice of medicine. >> and by sam's club. committed to small business and the spirit of the entrepreneur. and proud to support pbs's to the contrary with bonnie erbe. additional funding provided by... this week on a special edition of to the contrary, we take an indepth look at dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare diseases. [♪] >> hello i'm bonnie erbe welcome to to the contrary a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. this week we show you how advances in dna sequencing are helping scientists find cures for rare diseases especially rare childhood diseases. dr. james lupski is a man with a mission as a pediatrician at baylor college of medicine in houston, dr. lupski has devoted much of his medical career to researching and treating children with rare diseases. >> the patients
have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer
of having to continue the united states preeminence, not just in the space program but in terms of science and everything else that goes along, it ended up being washed away in stimulus funds. as this hearing has highlighted, the approach to this lacks clear mission. he is relying on the success of commercial space. i strongly support a public /private partnership for our space policy. it is up to now said to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector does the not have enough funds to do it by itself. that rocket means a net to overcome the administration's shortsightedness. they supported a mission to the moon. president obama has taken a been there done that approach. we have not been there for 40 years. the partners would have helped us. they have never been there. this will fill the void be left behind. that will have a trickle down of that on the number of people that we train as scientists and engineers to keep america's pre- eminence in practically everything else. would you please discuss the problems caused by the cancellation of the program and what is needed from c
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other examples. along with that we will have a big conference with italian innovators and venture capitalists and along with large hi tech companies of silicon valley and come together and focus on specific projects how to work together for technological innovation. it will be focused on silicon valley but also the cultural institute in san francisco we have surprises for you that we're preparing. any other questions? >> [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] the problem of the public -- i would like for you to answer it -- [inaudible] >> i try not to be technical, but i hope i would be pervasive just telling you the debt crisis is basically a crisis connected to the governments of the euro system that has hit some countries for some reasons. somewhat we were hit because of the sins of our past. we have been having -- we have had a relatively a sizable but stable debt for a long t
for the democrats. and there are folks who with political science looking at this who will say that latinos are really -- that republicans are leaving a lot of latino votes on the table because they're not participating in a comprehensive immigration reform, and i think that that's something that we're going to start to see change. yeah. >> and let me just add to that, too. you touched on it earlier, josh, this whole idea of the divide, the economic divide and the haves and the have-nots, and certainly, latino voters are part of the have-nots in many occasions. the occupy movement, which really got started in 2011, but really exploded in places like oak laerland earlier this year. what impact do you think that had on the national conversation? >> i think it enshrined a place in the national dialogue for issues like income disparity. i mean, the whole fiscal cliff situation is very much, look at the way that's being framed. 98% versus 2%. it's very close to the 99% that was the rallying cry of occupy, and the same thing with the argument over jobs versus austerity. are we going to go the way
health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
the bang for the box -- the buck. the basic science knowledge. testimony point out that we need to know these things. there are other societal benefits. isn't that really the way we should think of going? if dark basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human
that kind much an attention span. >> this is not rocket science. we are making trig nomety out of areth metic. >> take away the cell phones and computers f. it is not internet it is it something else. it helps them with learning. >> julian, thank you for being with us. >> coming up. >> the stuff that will pop after the ball drops and get ready to triple your money. >> time for special do i need to know? >> drug companies take a long time to get from the nation place to the market place. i own it and talked about it in the past. this year will be a good year. soming at two dollars a share.
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're about to say good-bye to 2012 but not before talking about some of the top legal cases of the year. for that we bring in the legal guys. avery friedman, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lo
to everybody, and this is -- science shows us, you look at the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star, but imagine when you look up and see a star, think hundreds of billions of light years away, and many of the stars you are looking at are gone. they no longer exist, and the billion of years the light takes to get to you, the star is actually gone, but the energy and life is immuneble and goes on forever. people, generations yet unborn feel the warmth and light of that body. that's who we are. we may have a finite time on earth, but every day, have a determination to burn as bright, warm, and brilliant as possible. that's the challenge. ultimately, the change makers are never the elected officials or the names read in history. this country has been fueled because of a conspiracy love. we don't know the names of the people, but they're the ones today that we benefit. i'll end, but my father, who i talk about in the book, had colorful things to say about me as i kid. he grew up in poverty, and i grew up in relative privilege. he said, boy, don't loo
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the rep
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. real people with our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness... oh my gosh, this looks amazing... [ male announcer ] 15 entrees under $15. it's our new maine stays! like chicken with wine sauce or bacon wrapped shrimp. try 15 under $15 and sea food differently. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ a delicious new way to get essential vitamins you need. just bite into the tasty shell... to a chewy vitamin core for a unique multivitamin sensation! new centrum flavor burst. >>> "nightline" continues from new york city with terry moran. >> in the age of google and siri, chances are you can't remember your boss's phone number. or maybe the capital of anywhere. but there are some people who make it their business to remember absolutely everything without the help of technolog
. >> have there been environmental science associated with these data centers? >> absolutely. we have a whole chapter on the case of the amazon in northern virginia. amazon was assessed large fines. it was around $200,000. that is very high in the world. you do not see find that high very often. -- fines that high very often. they were not getting the environmental permits for those generators. they were running them and causing emissions without getting the proper permits. they tell me they have now obtained those permits in northern virginia. that is what amazon told me when i contacted them for this story. >> james glanz, the quincy experience, how is it that quincy has become a growth area for these data centers? >> that's right. half a dozen. yahoo is right there. microsoft is the biggest. these data centers tend to cluster. part of the reason is that if energy prices are low, you'll get a lot of these data centers coming in. but you have other factors that come into play. one is connectivity to the fiber-optic. there is a lot of fiber optic in quincy. other things like tax break
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. the red cross was down here all the time. [ man ] they've given us a lot of heart. in times of need, they're there. ♪ [ kerry ] my dad was watching his house burn. he turned around, and all of a sudden, there was this guy standing there from the red cross. at a point where i had just lost everything, the idea that there was someone there... that's an amazing thing. ♪ temerity, temer . >>> the rising political star of 2013, chris hayes, who will that be? >> massachusetts senator elizabeth warren, i think it is not an easy thing to do what she did. you know, she was a star on this network and among progressives, but to go on particularly in massachusetts, i think she will be absolutely a force in massachusetts. >> it pains me to say it, but this is going to be the year when corey booker, he is either going to run for governor -- >> krystal, the rising star. >> the youngest woman in the house, also the first hindu-american woman in congress, combat veteran, really an amazing woman.
is an unabashed liberal but she is also on tv but she has a ph.d. in something, political science or something and charles murray would not want to be called a pundit. he is famous for controversy over the bell curve. this looks at white working-class to try to separate class from race which complicate everything and he looks at how the values of the lower white working class of gone down. there is this white elite adopted middle-class value, the working class lost those, a complex argument, advanced two places to describe these things. it is interesting, it is more than somebody ranting and raving. >> a scholar with the american enterprise institute as well, probably not fair to call him a political pundits. what about glen beck? he launched his own imprint, but his fox show is off the air. can you see the result of his sales? >> as far as i can tell glyn back, what he has been doing since he left fox has been trying to build a brand that reaches of very dedicated community not only through satellite oriented radio show but a new site called the blaze and other things going on through his web
: spelman college in atlanta and... c-span: in what subject? >> guest: in political science. and my master's and phd from harvard. c-span: and where are you getting your interest in political science along the way? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved ou
the sciences and humanities, which i don't think should be separated but often are, and let with other colleagues and researchers and create interesting collaborations. thank you so much. perhaps very appropriately, the great new zealand bibliographer donald francis mackenzie said if you know how to read it, every book is alive with the judgment of its maker. in the business of bibliography is learning how to read the human presences in every recorded task. and i think that we have certainly seen an example of how to recover those human judgments. those human presences through a capacious and db2 learned every article. he's he is the author of eight novels, two values in 10 volumes of essays in as many articles as some of our nations finest journals. a past deputy chairman of the national endowment for the humanities, he is the recipient of a national book critics circle award red the guggenheim and even a rock rockefeller award. when you think about his work in cytogenetics. i'm not entirely sure, but i'm sure that he can inform us about the nature of fiction, the book, and the future
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade.
, the deadline from. while the specific day is not based on science, this is not an arbitrary deadline, we need to make a decision around that time if we're going to do something other than, other than the base case. i would suggest that, if i might , perhaps the wording of the resolution to address what i think is a very clear issue of trust be something along the lines that if we're not able to achieve option 4, that we return to you on the meeting of february 5th, which would be coincidentally on february 1st to explain where we are. >> i personally would have no objection to that. and just to be clear, is it -- the decision under option 4 need to be made by february or all of the preconditions that we've talked about need to be sewed up? i mean, i realize there can be a point in january where it all
, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset to
of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do? the world responded as best it could. what we did, the naval maritime forces, we sent our balts group down there which was patroling the area, we sent the hospital ship comfort down. so you have the comfort on the east coast, you have the mercy on the west coast. the mercy is parked down in san diego. it just got back from its asian humanitarian assistance from guam, indonesia, vietnam, an amazing number of nations we're partnering with. those hospital ships with 1,000 beds, 12 operating rooms, they produce their o
is experimenting with is a program that dhs science and technology created and if you are ready to write it down, you can look online, you can google it, it's called the next generation incident command system or nics. it's a command and control web-based tool that we're looking with mit lincoln labs and dss and i would foresee when we stand up our wing operation center at miramar that the marine corps liaison and the navy liaison and if need be the guard liaison would have access to that tool. the next generation command system is a fantastic web-based command and control technology that we expect to use in the future. with that, thank you. >> thanks. colonel yeager. >> i just want to say you can't underestimate the risk presented by these environments we fly in and really the relationships that we build with cal fire and the training prepares us to mitigate that risk. as rear admiral riveras said, bad things tend it happen at night. they also happen on the weekend and i think we have a 3-day week jepld here but i assure you we are ready to respond. >> from personal experience in 2007, i
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits with the risks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen, and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. they all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead to death. this chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors such as high blood pressure or when nsaids are taken for long periods. nsaids, including celebrex, increase the chance of serious skin or allergic r
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> we're going to turn now, to our "consumer watchdog" tonight. and this internet scam thriving this holiday season. fbi reporting tonight with more than 150,000 stranded traveler complaints. and here's abc's elisabeth leamy now. >> reporter: it came from halfway around the world. a frightening e-mail that landed in an abc producer's inbox. it looked like it was from a friend. "my trip to manila, philippines, with my family has been a mess. i was hit at the back of my neck with a club. i need you to loan me some money." was this real or a hoax? skeptical, our producer decided to play along. "okay, don't worry." i think i can come up with a few hundred at least." we wired just 20 the con artist picked up the money within hours and complained. "you should have told me you never had any money." but we d
entrepreneur with a science degree or engineering degree and you graduate from mit. you want to start a high-tech company. would you started in the united states, where you're getting from your company years down the road will be taxed at 30%, or would you started in china or india where the capital gains tax rate is zero? many of our major partners have zero capital gains tax rates. if you are an entrepreneur or an investment and growth company, you would rather put your money there than in the united states in the future, which is really unfortunate. gerri: okay, let's talk about companies a little bit here. these tax rates are critical to growing companies. >> that's absoluty right. apple and microsoft, for example, benefited early on from high income individuals pumping and a few hundred thousand dollars to help those companies get started and grow. those high income people could alternatively put their money in and say tax-free muni bonds. if we raise the capital gains tax rates, which people are going to say, i'd ther put my money in state muni bonds. i'm not i am not going to fund the
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> greta: is story right out of jurassic park. a florida man pleaded guilty to smuggling stolen dinosaur bones from >> a keleton to a new york buyer for more than $1 million. that is when it caught the eye of federal officials. homeland security conducted an investigation into the fishy fossil dealings and in october arrested the florida dealer. prosecutors calling him a one man black market in prehistoric fossils and yesterday he pleaded guilty to smuggling charges and agreed to give up the one million dollars dinosaur skeleton. it will be returned to mongolia and the smuggler facing up to 17 years in prison. if a giant stolen dinosaur can get into the u.s. droid dna augmentation initiated. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thinning. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is that in this town, for some reason, you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable. >> when the president has to quote yogi berra, you know it's tough. that was president obama lamenting the state of affairs in washington, d.c. indeed, today's congress is on track to go down as the least productive congress since recordkeeping began. the 112th congress will come to a merciful end in early january. it has passed 219 bills that have actually been signed into law by president obama, according to the "huffington post". 219 bills. many of them insignificant measures like naming post offices. speaker john boehner's congress is about to take the prize for inaction. this is not a bipartisan problem. as stated by both liberal and conservative analysts, "we have been studying washington politics and congress for more than 40 years, and never have we seen the
is going to cost $10 million that is going to be built behind the science museum of virginia. there will be two full football folds, a field house with locker and weight rooms, a drill field and spectator areas. >>> at 6, a racy course on the 50 shades of gray is being offered at the university. now, it's an american studies class that will focus on the book's impasse on society. the professor believes the course is appropriate saying no other contemporaries text on sexuality transformed american culture the way this series has. >>> coming up, dairy clips. milk prices could double if lawmakers dilly dally any longer. why they need to get a move on it. and had to say that. >>> 2013 around the corner. what are you going to do to celebrate? coming up, what the preps are in new york city's time square. if you have a story idea, call the tipline at 202-895-3,000 end send us an e-mail if you want, www.fox5tips@wttg.com. back after this. ó if you have high blood pressure and get a cold get coricidin hbp. the number one pharmacist recommended cold brand designed for people with hig
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop taking chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serus allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these stop taking chantix and see your doctor right away as some c
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max also bests in mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. be
the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] yes, it is. restore revive rejuvenate rebuild rebuild rebuild >>> that's all for us at "outfront" tonight. erin is back next week and we'll be following all of the late breaking developments on the fiscal cliff negotiations which it will be a working weekend in washington. have a great weekend and a happy new year. "piers morgan" is next. [ cellphone chirping ] [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup fro
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. we can live without the &. restore revive rejuvenate rebuild rebuild rebuild >>> more breaking news now. the senate late tonight approving a $60.4 billion bill to rebuild after superstorm sandy. now, it goes to the house, but if both chambers fail to agree on a package before the current congressional term expires, then everyone will have to start again from scratch. >>> keeping them honest, this has been the least productive congress in modern history. at last count, a little more than 200 bills enacted. by comparison, the 80th congress, which then-president harry truman called the do-nothing congress, it managed to pass 906 bills into law. think about that as you watch the next report about one of the few things lawma
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant smoke? nah, i'm good. ♪ [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette, you celebrate a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former labor secreta secretary, robert reich, and amanda turco of "the huffington post." >>> then, chicago reaches the tragic milestone of 500 homicides in 2012. reverend jesse jackson will join me to discuss curbing gun violence in our cities. we'll be right back. sure. decaf or regular? regular. cake or pie? pie. apple or cherry? cherry. ♪ oil or cream? oil or cream? cream. [ male announcer ] with reddi-wip, a slice of pie never sounded better. that's because it's always made with real cream, never hydrogenated oil like some other whipped toppings. the sound of reddi-wip is the sound of joy. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. comfort indi
to become its director. he began at oxford in the junior position in law and social science of what he wrote to the ranks about the institution to become a tech executive. the cultural nature of human development, the accidental gorilla, peggy pascoe's book on law and race in america. daniel walker and his history of america between 1815 and 1848. ladies and gentlemen, niko pfund. anna. >> thank you very much for coming here. for listening to us talk friday afternoon. i'm so that we chose to spend your afternoon with us. i have spent 10 years working for a library in and spent about half of that time physically working in a library. as a director of nyu press, i am thrilled to be here and to talk to you about publishing. i was asked to give you a quick overview of our philosophy. it sounds a little pretentious, but i would say that in terms of how i look at what we do, it is squarely driven by the message of oup. we often say that we don't exist to make money, but we do have to make money to do the things that we exist to do. it really doesn't want form all the work that we engage in. perso
got his ba in political science from the university of florida and m.a. and phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> the automobile industry. last night and he was stopping production of vx. the electors frequently, as solid and no satisfactory radio and television shows onto human kind. even norm has competed for the misquotations in any given year and multimedia. norm is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute for public policy research. he writes a column for roll call. he's written for every publication on the face of the earth. he and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, and "nightline" charlie rose. he has another heart and are coming ba, magna laude from university of minnesota and a phd from university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think tom and warm is so much attention the outlook piece is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that would make it not, there really must be something wron
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